Bringing Ash Wednesday Home

The celebration of Ash Wednesday and the observance of Lent was not a part of my experience growing up, but over the past few years, I’ve grown to appreciate this time in the liturgical year to reflect, to repent, and to realign myself with God. And, I tell you, I’ve always loved Easter but it has so much more meaning and depth when connected to the preceding season of Lent.

Churches across America, even those that traditionally did not celebrate this season, are beginning to involve their congregations more and more in this time of reflection and repentance and it is a wonderful place for families to gather around the the story of God’s great Love and His unending faithfulness to us (For more on that from Family Life Today‘s Barbara Rainey, click here).

The first day of Lent and Ash Wednesday is coming (Wednesday, March 1, 2017). If your church doesn’t currently have an Ash Wednesday or Lent celebration (or if it gets snowed out), but you want to engage your family in the season, here are a few tools to use today/this week in your home that may give you some ideas and some guidance.

1. If you are on Facebook, search for a community activity called ‪#‎picturelent‬ . This online program walks you through Lent with devotions, activities and prayers for the whole 40 days. For more information, check out LEC Family at http://lecfamily.org/lent/. To see the scope and sequence of the entire event, click here

What is Lent? – http://lecfamily.org/daily-devotio…/…/what-is-lent-all-about

2. If videos are more your style,ash-wednesday check out these great though-provoking videos from the Skit Guys.

Prayer for Lent – https://skitguys.com/videos/item/a-prayer-for-lent
Pslams for Lent – https://skitguys.com/vid…/item/psalms-for-lent-ash-wednesday
Preparing for Lent – https://skitguys.com/videos/item/preparing-for-lent

3. Need some coloring pages for your younger kids? Check out the collection at http://www.theclipartwizard.com/lent-coloring-pages.htm

4. Host your own worship service at home with your kids. Here are a list of current worship songs (like those you’d find on K-Love) that have great application to Lent. Consider looking up videos on YouTube and creating a worship list so you can worship as a family.

http://seedbed.com/…/five-new-songs-to-consider-for-worshi…/

If you are more of a hymns family, here are a list of traditional Ash Wednesday hymns you may want to also look up!

http://www.worshipaccompaniment.com/?tag=ash-wednesday

5. There are several online Lenten devotionals you could choose to do as a family. If you do a search online, you will find many from various faith traditions. Here is one that is a collaborative effort from a number of denominations and even comes with a free App so you can keep up on your devices.

6. Likewise there are many online resources for celebrating Lent with your kids. Many of these are particular to a denomination, so an online search will provide you with lots of options.  This page has a huge list of resources including a devotional from Ann Voskamp, Lilly Lewin and multiple crafts and activities for kids and families.

Whether you have traditionally celebrated Lent or not, these resources are worth checking out and considering as a way to invite Christ into your home. At the very least, it will open a chance for discussion with your family about why we celebrate Easter and why Christ’s death and resurrection is such a beautiful picture of God’s love, grace and faithfulness to us!

May your Lenten season be one full of knowing all those attributes deeper and more personally then you have ever experienced before. Blessings friends!


For more information about

Check out to ReFocus Ministry or “like” our Facebook page. Join our conversation at theReFocus Family and Intergen Ministry group on Facebook.

About this Blog

family

Refocus Ministry was started by Christina Embree, wife to Pastor Luke, mom to three wonderful kids, and family minister at Nicholasville UMC. She is passionate about seeing churches partnering with families to encourage faith formation at home and equipping parents to disciple their kids in the faith. She recently graduated with a Masters of Arts in Ministry focusing on Family, Youth and Children’s Ministry at Wesley Seminary, she also blogs at www.refocusministry.org and is a contributing blogger at D6 Family and  Seedbed

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One Word We Get Wrong In Family Ministry

Having just returned from a wonderful children’s ministry conference (CM Conference 2017 by CM Connect) I was struck by something that I hear said repeatedly, but erroneously, in regards to family ministry. It’s said with good intention and it’s stated with emphasis, but it misses an important fact that cannot be overlooked.
conceptual-1280533_1280Over recent years there has been a movement in churches towards a more family-focused, intergenerational ministry environment. One major platform proponents of this transition stand on is that “the home should be the primary place of spiritual formation.” Entire curricula, such as Orange from ReThink Group and Faith 5 from Rich Melheim, are predicated upon this premise.
As a family minister, I happen to agree with this viewpoint with one caveat – I do not believe that the home should be the primary place of spiritual formation, I believe it is the primary place of spiritual formation.

The question isn’t should it be that but rather, since the home is where faith is formed, how should that affect how we do church?

Any number of studies, secular or sacred, about the impact of influences during childhood and young adulthood will consistently lead to one conclusion – the parents and/or caregivers have the most lasting impact on worldview and faith formation.

The Sticky Faith group at Fuller Youth Institute have studied the reasons young people walk away from the church, looking for a “silver bullet” for churches and parents to use to keep that from happening.  Their top finding was that time spent talking and living faith in the home was the biggest indicator of a faith that sticks in kids.

According to Jim Burns at HomeWord ministries, kids that talk about their faith at home with mom and dad have a 80% chance of remaining in church once they leave the home.

IF THAT IS TRUE, THAN NO MATTER WHAT, THE HOME, THE PLACE WHERE INTERACTION TAKES PLACE BETWEEN THE CHILD AND THE PARENT/CAREGIVER, IS THE PLACE WHERE FAITH IS FORMED.

Now, it may not be the kind of faith that we as ministers in the church would like to see formed in children. It may be no faith in God at all. But regardless, faith is being formed at home all the time, everywhere, for every child.

So what is our response?

As ministers, we cannot assume that what we share on Sunday will become lived out on Monday unless we are somehow impacting and reaching into the home. We must connect outside the four walls of our church. We must continue beyond the initial engagement of an outreach event. We must recognize that even if our title is still Children’s Pastor, we are also Parent Pastor and Caregiver Counselor and Home Helper. Sunday may be our landing zone, but our work must be done outside home base.

It is no longer a question of whether or not the home should be the primary place for faith formation and spiritual growth. We do not have to wonder if parents should be spiritually leading their kids or discipling them in faith.

These things are. They simply are.

And the question for us is, “What do we do about it?”

(This article was taken in part from an article written by me and  originally published in February 2015 at Children’s Ministry Blog.com.) 


For more information about

Check out to ReFocus Ministry or “like” our Facebook page. Join our conversation at theReFocus Family and Intergen Ministry group on Facebook.

About this Blog

family

Refocus Ministry was started by Christina Embree, wife to Pastor Luke, mom to three wonderful kids, and family minister at Nicholasville UMC. She is passionate about seeing churches partnering with families to encourage faith formation at home and equipping parents to disciple their kids in the faith. She recently graduated with a Masters of Arts in Ministry focusing on Family, Youth and Children’s Ministry at Wesley Seminary, she also blogs at www.refocusministry.org and is a contributing blogger at D6 Family and  Seedbed

Lone Ranger Kidmin?

I think this is something I hear more than anything else when I talk to weary children’s ministers and family pastors and youth directors: “I feel so alone.”  It’s an awful feeling, right?  There is nothing to compare it to. Everything feels like an upward battle. You feel exposed and weak and there’s no safety or place to find rest.

Yesterday at CM Conference 2017 by CMConnect, Heidi Hensley told us why.  Simply put she said, “We are designed to be with one another. We aren’t designed to be around each other. We are designed to be in community with one another.”

alone-1869997_1920God made us to be with others. He made others to be with us.

So when we are alone or feel alone, it is an awful feeling, because we were made for more.  I spoke to Heidi ahead of time and asked her what she wanted people to walk away with from the time with and she responded, “A stronger desire and understanding for the need for community and connection with one another.”  That’s exactly what happened. I’m going to just let you read my notes because what she shares from Ecclesiastes 4:9-12 shows us just how we were designed to work, live, grow and thrive with one another.

When you are at work

“Two are better than one because they have a better return for their labor” Ecc. 4:9

Whenever we work together, we reap the benefits of the labor together. We realize that it’s not about it. When we work alone, it’s easy to identify “I did that” but when “we” do that, it’s about God.

When we fall down

“If either of them falls down, the other can help the other up. But pity anyone who fails and has no one to help them up.” Ecc. 4:10

Pay attention to your warning lights. More importantly, pay attention to who sees your warning lights going off and that you are close enough to listen to if they point it out? You need people in your life who know your weak spots and see your warning lights going off.

When you get cold

“Also if two lie down together they will keep warm. But how can one keep warm alone?” Ecc. 4:11

How can we stay on fire for God without people in our circle who are keeping us warm? And how can those around us stay on fire if we are silent? Look around the “playground” and see who is falling and who is hurt. Look around your church and the churches around you and see who needs encouragement.

When you go to battle

“Though one may be overpowered, two can defend themselves” Ecc 4:12a

Sometimes when you think you about to land, a crash landing is coming. When soldiers get in formation for battle, they literally cover each other’s back. They don’t turn around. Their faces are out and weapons we ready. They absolutely trust one another and believe they are being looked out for from the other. We shouldn’t have to turn around and ask to be covered; that should be what is happening. We need to surround ourselves with prayer warriors, accountability partners, and trusted friends.

“A cord of three strands is not easily broken” Ecc. 4:12b

Where do we find relationships like this? When we get close to Jesus, we get close to people. And the closer we get to Jesus, the closer we are able to get to other people.

This isn’t a to-do list.

Heidi was quick to tell us that she wasn’t telling us to run out the doors and set up an accountability group or a secret Facebook page for trusted friends or any number of things. She challenged us to do what this quote says: “I went out to find a friend, and they were nowhere. I went out to be a friend, and they were everywhere.”

There’s a real reason why lone ranger kidmin doesn’t work.

Because we, the people doing the ministry, need each other. We need teams and we need a community. We were never meant to go it alone. How can we help each other find that safe place, where backs are covered, and trust is implicit?  I’d love to know your thoughts!!

P.S. Parents weren’t supposed to go it alone either! Parents are called to pass on our faith at home in the midst of a faith community who joined us in our discipleship and supported us in our work of faith formation. It’s an US not a THEM when it comes to discipleship in the home. Click here for more on that!!


For more information about

Check out to ReFocus Ministry or “like” our Facebook page. Join our conversation at theReFocus Family and Intergen Ministry group on Facebook.

About this Blog

family

Refocus Ministry was started by Christina Embree, wife to Pastor Luke, mom to three wonderful kids, and family minister at Nicholasville UMC. She is passionate about seeing churches partnering with families to encourage faith formation at home and equipping parents to disciple their kids in the faith. She recently graduated with a Masters of Arts in Ministry focusing on Family, Youth and Children’s Ministry at Wesley Seminary, she also blogs at www.refocusministry.org and is a contributing blogger at D6 Family and  Seedbed

“No One Is Listening” and other Millennial Concerns

I’ve seen an article entitled “59 Percent of Millennials Raised in a Church Have Dropped Out—And They’re Trying to Tell Us Why“shared at least a dozen times over the last few days. As someone who works in ministry with families and children, it breaks my heart…but probably not for the reasons you think.

It breaks my heart because we are doing it again, to another generation, one that doesn’t have a catchy name yet or a voice to describe their concerns.

(Please read the article if you haven’t already, so what comes next makes sense).

What is even more disheartening to me than the fact that we are doing it again, is that this generation mostly has parents in the Millennial generation who, instead of ensuring their kids have a different church experience than they did, seem to be content with things staying the same for their children’s experience.

But where do we think the sense of “no one is listening” started? The “You can’t sit with us” mentality is inherent in many of our church practices that divide generations into siloed groups as soon as they walk into the doors of the church.

Many leading curriculum for children are “values-based” so our children grow tired of hearing about values and mission statements and most churches allocate the smallest budgets to those working with children and youth (both their employees and their working ministry budget) and we wonder why there’s a distrust about the misallocation of funds.

We fail to set up mentoring environments for children, often offering programs without intergenerational connections needed for discipleship, and we talk “about” the children and youth a lot but fail to find ways for them to connect and belong to the larger church body.

We avoid talking to them about the “controversial issues” of the day or even helping their parents to (or parents choose not to attend or seek out the support offered) and we keep the public perception of children’s ministry and youth ministry as primary a childcare or babysitting service that allows adults to go to church.

child-1439468_1920Every time I share these things, I get kickback that kids and youth need age-appropriate spaces to learn and adults/parents need a break from kids and I AGREE! But if we read this article and think that we are going to solve the Millennial problem without addressing the system that got them where they are, we are not being very wise.

We can’t keep doing what we’ve been doing and hope it is somehow different for the next generation.

We’ve got to find ways to break outside our siloed molds and reach across the generational gap and learn to worship, commune, grow, discuss and live together if we don’t want another article like this one written in the future.

I’ve read a lot of comments that say, “It’s like this for every generation.” Perhaps there are some similar frustrations, but not every generation has only 4% that claim to believe the Bible and a 59% dropout rate for church.

It won’t change unless we do (which is another critique offered in the article – failing to adapt). It’s not the culture’s fault (another critique); it is ours. And we need to own it and start thinking outside the Millennial box to their children and the generation that is following in their footsteps.  We need to end the Millennial postmortem and look to the next generation.


For more information about

Check out to ReFocus Ministry or “like” our Facebook page. Join our conversation at theReFocus Family and Intergen Ministry group on Facebook.

About this Blog

family

Refocus Ministry was started by Christina Embree, wife to Pastor Luke, mom to three wonderful kids, and family minister at Nicholasville UMC. She is passionate about seeing churches partnering with families to encourage faith formation at home and equipping parents to disciple their kids in the faith. She recently graduated with a Masters of Arts in Ministry focusing on Family, Youth and Children’s Ministry at Wesley Seminary, she also blogs at www.refocusministry.org and is a contributing blogger at D6 Family and  Seedbed

When the Disciples Disciple: Letting Kids Live Out Their Faith

It was Sunday night. School the next day so 7:30 bedtime for the little man. But we also had company and I didn’t want to leave her hanging. I got him dressed for bed and asked one of his older sisters to read him his Bible story before bed. With minimal grumbling she came over and I headed out the door.

And then I paused.

I’m so glad I paused.siblings-929939_1920

“Okay buddy, what story did you read the last time?” she asked

“Hmm, I don’t remember.”

“Here, look at the pictures,” she replied.

“Oh, yeah!! It was about how God was born!”

“That’s right. You read about Jesus being born. Do you know why He did that?  Because He loves you SO much! Did you know that Jesus loves you?  He really, really does!”

Be still, my mommy heart. 

We hear it all the time. I say it all the time. Our ministry as parents and caregivers in the home is to disciple our children in the faith. To help them find and form their faith; to help them know and experience the love of God.

But it’s not so they can just have their own personal experience. It’s so that after they’ve been discipled, they can disciple others. It’s so they can express their faith experience and give it away to others, just as they’ve had it given to them.

It’s so they can say, “Do you know Jesus loves you?  He really, really does!”

As a teacher, I would always tell my students the best way to learn something is to teach it to someone else. There is something about putting what we’ve learned into action that really makes it stick. The same it true when it comes to our faith. Our experience becomes so much more “sticky” when we share it when someone else.

So, it got me thinking – how can I help my own kids grow their faith in this way?  How can I give them some experience that will let them pass on what they’ve learned?  

Here are four ways that I considered – I’d love to hear what is happening in your home!

Switch Roles – Open-ended questions are our friend. Inviting children to share a story almost always leads to one. I tried this out on my oldest. I simply asked, “When’s the last time you really felt God talk to you?” At first she deflected but after thinking about it she shared an experience where she felt God personally interacting with her. I let her talk. “Tell me about it.  How did that make you feel? What are some ways you think we can connect with God?  What’s your advice for me?” I was the disciple…the student became the teacher. It was..pretty great.

Connect the Generations – If there is one thing I’ve become more and more convinced of it is that children need to interact with those older and younger than they are. Having an older child pray with, read to, or play alongside of a younger child opens the door for discipleship to happen. Having a younger child draw pictures for, sing songs to, or act out a Bible story in front of an older child or person gives them space to re-tell what they are learning about God. We really need each other if a fuller image of God is to be grasped by all.

Set them up for Success – Create space for children to live out what they are learning. Find ways to serve in the community and in the home and make the opportunity available to them. When you read a portion of Scripture or talk about our relationship with God, offer them ways that they can live it out. Give them the chance to interact with others in a way that it puts flesh on the theology. Some ideas would be to clean up your neighborhood or local park, serving a neighbor or friend, or cleaning for a sibling (that will test love like nothing else; ask me how I know).

Be Intentional – After hearing the conversation between my son and daughter, I’ve decided to be more intentional about asking my girls to read with him and talk to him about God. How cool would it be when he is older for him to remember these foundational truths of God and His love to have come from his sisters?  And the unique bond that would create between them?  Even younger kids can do this just by giving space for them to say “Jesus loves you” to one another. Be creative but be intentional.

life-862967_1920As I walked back downstairs that night, the words of John rang in my heart – “I have no greater joy than to hear that my children are walking in the truth” (3 Jn 1:4).  True discipleship begets disciples that disciple and so on. Legacy-making takes faith from one generation to the other through the act of continued discipleship. We pour into them and they pour into others. Our work of discipleship doesn’t end with just our children; it goes on for generations to come.

Let’s give our kids the chance to start building on that legacy even now when they are young. And let’s let them pour back into us as they come to know and live into the love of Christ in their own lives. This is exciting stuff!!  We are part of something bigger and so are our children!  Let’s live it like its meant to be lived – fully and abundantly, for all eternity!


For more information about

Check out to ReFocus Ministry or “like” our Facebook page. Join our conversation at theReFocus Family and Intergen Ministry group on Facebook.

About this Blog

family

Refocus Ministry was started by Christina Embree, wife to Pastor Luke, mom to three wonderful kids, and family minister at Nicholasville UMC. She is passionate about seeing churches partnering with families to encourage faith formation at home and equipping parents to disciple their kids in the faith. She recently graduated with a Masters of Arts in Ministry focusing on Family, Youth and Children’s Ministry at Wesley Seminary, she also blogs at www.refocusministry.org and is a contributing blogger at D6 Family and  Seedbed

Sometimes, Church is Confusing

The more I’ve worked in the “church world,” the more aware I have become that this whole “raising up the next generation” and “growing the Kingdom of God” thing is really a team effort. And by team effort, I mean, it involves all. the .people…not just the ones who get paid or do a specific job or raise the children.

Recently, I had a parent share with me one of their struggles with raising their kids in the faith. It wasn’t that they had a hard time talking to their kids about God or the Bible or even the tough issues of the day. It wasn’t that their church didn’t have a good ministry to kids and youth or that they felt left out of what was happening there. It wasn’t even that they were too busy or they were too tired or they were too ill-equipped.

Their struggle was simply this – there’s too much going on.

The church they attend is what we tend to refer to as “siloed.”  The children go one place on Sunday morning, the youth another, and the adults another. The children have one lesson, the youth have another, and the adults another. The children have their group of friends, the youth have theirs and the adults have theirs. A ne’er the two shall meet…at least within the church context.

mistake-1966448_1920So besides all the separate events, lessons, and friendship, there is also the struggle of trying to have a unified conversation. Because in their youngest child’s eyes, the children’s pastor is her pastor. Their teen sees the youth pastor as his pastor and, of course, the parents see the senior pastor as their pastor. It is…confusing.

They all go to the same church, but in a very real sense, they go to three separate churches. 

Now, this isn’t a post to discuss the pros and cons of this approach (although I’d be happy to hash that out at some other time), rather this is a wake-up call for those of us who serve in ministry to consider – what message are we giving to families?

And by that I mean, do we work as a team to keep one vision, one mission, and one message in front of families so that they can unite around one faith community and join in one mission?

Or do we tend to focus on our own area, making sure that we take care of our “congregants” and our curriculum/sermon (totally looking at myself now too!)?

I know there are some churches out there that do this fabulously! But some of us struggle with this disconnect. It’s not that the staff doesn’t want to work together; it’s that most of our materials, trainings, and curriculum are set-up on a way that leads to a division rather than a coming together.

So what can we do?

  1. Be Intentional about being a TEAM  – Talk to one another about what each area is doing and find ways to connect with the others. Go serve in one another’s “spaces”. Learn each other’s “language” and find ways to have a common message or voice.
  2. Be Intentional about being ONE church – Even if your church expresses itself in multiple ways, seek to create a single mission/vision that the church can built itself around. Use that singularity to help fuel all the expressions.
  3. Be Intentional about holding ONE conversation – There are a lot of ways to do this. Curriculum like D6 2Gen and Group’s Faithweavers that have the whole church look at one Scripture. Create units based around certain themes or Scriptures that the whole church walks through together. Offer special Bible study or small groups through the year that the church does together.
  4. Be Intentional about learning TOGETHER – So many training opportunities and conferences are built around specialty areas and not applicable to the whole team. That’s one reason I love D6 Conference. It’s for the WHOLE team. There’s something for everyone and more importantly, something for the group as a whole, to learn together and vision together.* Find ways to grow together so that vision gets instilled across the entire team.

As much as I love children and family ministry (and I do!), I am realizing more and more that if we are going to effectively raise the next generation in the faith and grow the kingdom of God, we are going to have to strive to create a space that emphasizes community on mission together, with one heart, one vision, one conversation that continues throughout the week, at home, at school, and at church.

*If you are considering finding a way for your team to grow today, I highly recommend D6 Conference. Check it out and let me know if you have any questions. If you decide to attend (yay!), when you register, use the code “RefocusD6” to receive $20 off each registration. And…I’ll see you there!!


For more information about

Check out to ReFocus Ministry or “like” our Facebook page. Join our conversation at theReFocus Family and Intergen Ministry group on Facebook.

About this Blog

family

Refocus Ministry was started by Christina Embree, wife to Pastor Luke, mom to three wonderful kids, and family minister at Nicholasville UMC. She is passionate about seeing churches partnering with families to encourage faith formation at home and equipping parents to disciple their kids in the faith. She recently graduated with a Masters of Arts in Ministry focusing on Family, Youth and Children’s Ministry at Wesley Seminary, she also blogs at www.refocusministry.org and is a contributing blogger at D6 Family and  Seedbed

 

If We Are Supposed to Disciple our Kids at Home, Do We Even Need to Go to Church?

If you keep up with trends in the church, you know that one of the major ones is the decline of regular attendance at Sunday morning worship times. Some studies indicate that a regularly attending family may only be in church once or twice a month.

Additionally, there is a rising recognition that the home is the primary place of spiritual formation and that the parents are the greatest influence of faith in their children and that message gets shared with parents on an increasing basis (just look at my last post).

When considering these facts, it can begin to feel as though the church is becoming…well, inconsequential. Pointless. I mean, if the time at church with the children is so minuscule and the influence so secondary, why do we even go to church?

Does going to church as a family even matter?

Yes. Yes. Yes!  A thousand times…Yes!

You see, right from the start, God intended the faith community to be an integral part of the spiritual growth of children. When Moses shared with parents that they should talk about their faith when they sit at home and when they walk along the road, and when they rise and before they sleep, he did so in the presence of the entire Israelite community (Deut. 4:10). All of Israel was there.

All of Israel heard the commands. They all understood that the responsibility to nurture the following generations. They all understood that if things were going to go well for them and if they would increase greatly in a land flowing with milk and honey then THEY ALL needed to pass on their faith to their “children and their children after them” (Deut. 6:1).

The parents were never supposed to do it alone.

We were supposed to pass on our faith at home in the midst of a faith community who joined us in our discipleship and supported us in our work of faith formation.

sunday-school-kidsThat’s what the church is supposed to be doing today!  As a faith community, the church is the place where parents find nurture, support, and equipping for the work they are called to do. And those who minister to families and children, whether paid or volunteer, have the unique privilege to be the hands and feet of that partnership.

And that’s why that hour or two, that short period of time each week, is so important.

In 1976, developmentalist John Westerhoff wrote a book entitled Will our Children have Faith? and concluded with this answer: “that depends on whether or not they are embraced and formed within a faith community.” In other words, yes, even though parents have the greatest influence, his studies found that how children are engaged in the church has profound effects on how their faith grows.

 Children need the formative influence of the faith community. They need relationships with each other, with the youth in church and with the adults in church (Dr. Catherine Stonehouse, 2016).

What happens with that time is crucially important for the whole family.

It is worth the time, the effort, and the love necessary in regularly bringing our children to church.

What happens in that hour or two can create for a child a deep sense of belongingpurpose, and meaning within a community that coincides with the values and teachings of their parents and creates relationships that can last long into the future. As parents, taking our kids to church opens the door for us to…

  • Seek for ways to nurture and support connections within the faith community.
  • Create intentional space for intergenerational relationships 
  • Find times for children to join the faith community in worship, in serving, in sharing the story of faith.
  • Find ways to engage the children in their legacy, the legacy of our faith.

My mom often told me in regard to parenting that the days are long but the years are short. When it comes to bringing our children to church, the hours spent there may feel short, but the legacy lasts long. Let’s make the discipleship of our children a both/and not an either/or and give them the riches found in the community of faith known as the body of Christ.

I originally wrote this post to encourage children, youth, and family pastors that their work in the church matters greatly. To read the original version, click here


For more information about

Check out to ReFocus Ministry or “like” our Facebook page. Join our conversation at theReFocus Family and Intergen Ministry group on Facebook.

About this Blog

family

Refocus Ministry was started by Christina Embree, wife to Pastor Luke, mom to three wonderful kids, and family minister at Nicholasville UMC. She is passionate about seeing churches partnering with families to encourage faith formation at home and equipping parents to disciple their kids in the faith. She recently graduated with a Masters of Arts in Ministry focusing on Family, Youth and Children’s Ministry at Wesley Seminary, she also blogs at www.refocusministry.org and is a contributing blogger at D6 Family and  Seedbed